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Tuesday, December 1
 

09:30 +12

Opening Plenary: Promoting responsible business conduct in the Pacific
Keynote address by Hon. Attorney-General, Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum, of the Republic of Fiji.

Moderators
avatar for Heike Alefsen

Heike Alefsen

Regional Representative for the Pacific, OHCHR

Speakers
avatar for Hon. Attorney-General Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum

Hon. Attorney-General Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum

Attorney-General ; Minister for Economy, Civil Service, and Communications ; and Minister for Climate Change, Government of Fiji
Hon. Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum is the Attorney-General and Minister for Economy, Civil Service, and Communications, and also serves the Minister responsible for climate change.Since joining the Fijian Government in 2007, Mr Sayed-Khaiyum has spearheaded efforts to modernise Fiji’s laws... Read More →
avatar for Anita Ramasastry

Anita Ramasastry

Chair, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights
avatar for Emeline Siale ILOLAHIA

Emeline Siale ILOLAHIA

Executive Director, Pacific Islands Association of Non-Government Organizations (PIANGO)
Emeline Siale Ilolahia has a strong history of over 10 years of experience and track record in promoting sustainable growth and social development in the pacific region and a reputation for developing strong partnerships within the civil society sector. She has exposure in regional... Read More →
avatar for Sanaka Samarasinha

Sanaka Samarasinha

Resident Coordinator of Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu, Resident Coordinator Office (RCO)
Sanaka Samarasinha commenced his appointment as the United Nations Resident Coordinator for the Republic of Fiji in 2018, with multi-country coverage of nine other Pacific Island Countries. Sanaka had served as the UN Resident Coordinator and UNDP Resident Representative (RC/RR) in... Read More →
avatar for Alisi Tuqa

Alisi Tuqa

Chief Executive Officer, Pacific Islands Private Sector Organisation (PIPSO)


Tuesday December 1, 2020 09:30 - 10:30 +12
Britannia room 1 Victoria Parade, Suva, Fiji

11:00 +12

Business and human rights: Introduction to the UN Guiding Principles and linkages with SDGs
The session will be run as an interactive workshop to raise awareness amongst the Pacific Forum participants about the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGPs), the authoritative global standard in the business and human rights field. It will also show linkages between the UNGPs and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and how the national action plans on business and human rights could facilitate a synergy between the two.

This session aims to:
  • Introduce key concepts as well as the respective obligations of states and responsibilities of businesses under the UNGPs;
  • Explore linkages between the UNGPs and the SDGs; and
  • Discuss how implementing that UNGPs may contribute to overcoming business and human rights challenges in the Pacific region and in turn achieving inclusive and sustainable development.

Session organized by UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights.

Speakers
avatar for Surya Deva

Surya Deva

Member, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights
avatar for Justine Nolan

Justine Nolan

Professor, Faculty of Law, University of New South Wales
Justine Nolan is a Professor in the Faculty of Law at UNSW Sydney. She is a Visiting Professorial Scholar at NYU's Stern Center for Business and Human Rights. Justine's research focuses on the intersection of business and human rights, in particular, corporate responsibility for human... Read More →



Tuesday December 1, 2020 11:00 - 12:30 +12
Britannia room 1 Victoria Parade, Suva, Fiji

13:30 +12

Climate change and climate justice
From extreme storms, to rising sea levels and scorching temperatures, communities and countries across the Pacific region are already experiencing the devastating physical impacts and human rights consequences of our rapidly warming climate. In this session you will hear from communities, governments and business across the region who are ‘not drowning, but fighting,’ using a range of strategies, from diplomacy and adaptation, to legal tactics and protest, to confront climate change.

Responsibility for the primary causes of climate change – the extraction and burning of fossil fuels – is highly asymmetrical across the region, making this a thorny geopolitical issue. Companies active in countries like Australia and Papua New Guinea, aided by governments, continue to expand fossil fuels production, at the expense of human rights across the region. This session will address that asymmetry through the lens of climate justice.

This session aims to:
  • Highlight the connections between corporate activity, atmospheric conditions and human rights impacts;
  • Build solidarity across the region among communities and countries leading the fight for climate justice;
  • Share knowledge of different strategies and tactics being used to seek protection and respect for human rights in a climate change context, and pursue remedy;
  • Reinforce the need for business to work with communities and governments across the Pacific region to mitigate and adapt to climate change.

Session organized by Australasian Centre for Corporate Responsibility (ACCR)

Moderators
avatar for Brynn O'Brien

Brynn O'Brien

Executive Director, The Australasian Centre for Corporate Responsibility (ACCR)
Brynn O’Brien is the Executive Director of the Australasian Centre for Corporate Responsibility (ACCR). ACCR promotes better performance of Australian listed companies on environmental and social issues, and especially on climate change. As an active shareholder organisation, ACCR... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Tishiko King

Tishiko King

Organising Coordinator, SEEDmob
Tishiko King is a proud Torres Strait Islander with strong connections to Masig and Badu Islands and is the Community Organiser at Seed Indigenous Youth Climate Network. In addition to her work at Seed, Tish volunteers as an impact coordinator with the Environmental Film Festival... Read More →
avatar for Alex Sen Gupta

Alex Sen Gupta

Research scientist and Lecturer, Climate Change Research Centre (CCRC) at the university of New South Wales (UNSW)
Alex is a climate scientist and oceanographer based at the Climate Change Research Center. His work revolves around the role of the ocean in the climate system. His interests include: how the ocean controls regional climate (like rainfall over land), how climate change will affect... Read More →
avatar for Roberto Eugenio T. Cadiz

Roberto Eugenio T. Cadiz

Commissioner, Commission on Human Rights of the Philippines
Commissioner Roberto Eugenio T. Cadiz was appointed to the Commission on Human Rights of the Philippines in 2015, where he now handles Business and Human Rights, Sustainable Development Goals, Crisis and Conflict, International Humanitarian Law, and Peace. He also supervises the... Read More →
avatar for Kate Mackenzie

Kate Mackenzie

Consultant on climate, public policy, investment and finance, and Columnist, Bloomberg
Kate Mackenzie is an independent consultant who advises organisations pursuing the Paris Agreement goals on climate change, particularly in relation to finance and economics, strategy, and communication. She is also a regular contributor for Bloomberg Green, where she writes the... Read More →
avatar for Samantha Kuman

Samantha Kuman

Advocacy Officer, Center for Environmental Law & Community Rights Inc (CELCOR), Papua New Guinea
Samantha Kuman is an Advocacy Officer for the Centre for Environmental Law and Community Rights Inc, is a not for profit public interest environmental law firm. CELCOR seeks to provide legal advice and assistance to landowners, Community Based Organizations (CBO’s) and NGO’s involved... Read More →


Tuesday December 1, 2020 13:30 - 15:00 +12
Britannia room 1 Victoria Parade, Suva, Fiji

13:30 +12

Corruption, Business and Human Rights
The session focuses on the corruption impact on business and human rights issues and case studies relevant to the Pacific region. Key business and human rights challenges in the Pacific will be addressed, as well as expectations for companies to carry out human rights due diligence, creating incentives through public procurement, and taking steps to ensure a ‘bouquet of remedies’ is available to victims. Panelists will also discuss opportunities to promote responsible business conduct in the Pacific.

This session aims to:
  • Increase awareness of the interplay between business-related human rights abuses and corruption in general;
  • Enhanced knowledge of the impacts of COVID-19 being felt by the Pacific through a human rights and corruption lens;
  • Consider ways to encourage business enterprises to conduct human rights due diligence in consultation with civil society organizations, trade unions and human rights defenders.

Key questions:
  • Would improving governance frameworks and increasing anti-corruption measures reduce business-related human rights abuses from occurring?
  • What affect has COVID-19 had on human-rights in the Pacific?
  • What are some key steps governments and civil society actors can take to reduce business-related human rights abuses?

Session organized by United Nations Pacific Regional Anti-Corruption (UN-PRAC) Project.

Moderators
avatar for John Hyde

John Hyde

Anti-Corruption Consultant, UN Pacific Regional Anti-Corruption (UN-PRAC) Project
JOHN HYDE is a consultant with the UN Pacific Regional Anti-Corruption (UN-PRAC) Project, specialising in private sector, media and parliament engagement. John was Chair of the Western Australian Legislative Assembly’s Joint Parliamentary Committee on the Corruption and Crime Commission... Read More →
avatar for Sonja Stefanovska Trajanoska

Sonja Stefanovska Trajanoska

UNDP Anti-Corruption Adviser, UNDP
SONJA STEFANOVSKA-TRAJANOSKA is a governance and anti-corruption expert with over 20 years of progressive experience in the UN system.She is currently serving as UNDP Anti-Corruption with the UNDP Pacific Office in Fiji.Sonja holds a a Ph.D. degree in political science; a Master’s... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Anita Ramasastry

Anita Ramasastry

Chair, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights
avatar for Annika Wythes

Annika Wythes

Regional Anti-Corruption Adviser - Pacific, UNODC
Annika Wythes is the UNODC Regional Anti-Corruption Adviser in the Pacific under the joint UNODC-UNDP Pacific Regional Anti-Corruption (UN-PRAC) Project and the designated UNODC Representative in the Pacific. She has been with UNODC working on corruption since March 2009, previously... Read More →
avatar for Miliana Iga

Miliana Iga

Executive, Pacific Youth Forum Against Corruption
Ms Miliana Iga has been involved extensively in the fight against corruption in the Pacific region. In 2015 along with her fellow youth anticorruption advocates from 13 Pacific Island Countries, they formed the Pacific Youth Forum Against Corruption (PYFAC)She has been part of policy... Read More →
avatar for Kautoa Tonganibeia

Kautoa Tonganibeia

President, Kiribati Chamber of Commerce & Industry



Tuesday December 1, 2020 13:30 - 15:00 +12
Britannia room 3 Victoria Parade, Suva, Fiji

15:30 +12

Building back better in times of COVID-19: Small business’ resilience in an era of climate emergency and a global pandemic
In an era of compound and consecutive disasters, Pacific Island Countries (PICs) face an elevated risk of experiencing a natural hazard combined with the impacts of the COVID-19 crisis. Although the successful containment of COVID-19 at borders has allowed most PICs to remain virus free, and to avert a full-scale lockdown and forced closure of businesses, the immense indirect socioeconomic impact of the global pandemic will have long-lasting effects on the livelihoods and resilience of communities across the region.

Businesses remain at the forefront of experiencing the global crisis. Their resilience and ability to bounce back is fundamental for the socio-economic well-being of communities across the region. This session will examine how small businesses and the informal sector have endured the global pandemic until now, and the role of the government, chambers of commerce and other actors in enhancing their resilience to compound and consecutive disasters going forward.

This session aims to:
  • Build an understanding of how the global pandemic has impacted small businesses in the Pacific, including their response, and business continuity and recovery plans until now.
  • Explore the roles and responsibilities of the government, private sector (including chambers of commerce), CSOs and other stakeholders in supporting the resilience and recovery of small businesses and the informal sector going forward.
  • Explore opportunities to improve the support available to the informal sector in the face of disasters, where access to information, insurance coverage, and the protection of fundamental rights of workers and other vulnerable groups is most lacking.

Session organized by UNDRR Pacific Sub-Regional Office.

Moderators
avatar for Robert Vaughan

Robert Vaughan

Human Rights Officer, OHCHR

Speakers
avatar for Krishnan Narasimhan

Krishnan Narasimhan

Deputy Programme Manager, UN Capital Development Fund (UNCDF)
Representing the United Nations Capital Development Fund managed Pacific Financial Inclusion Programme (PFIP). Improving access to affordable and appropriate financial services to low-income Pacific islanders and small businesses is the core mandate of the Programme. Through grant... Read More →
avatar for Alisi Tuqa

Alisi Tuqa

Chief Executive Officer, Pacific Islands Private Sector Organisation (PIPSO)
avatar for Lati Qoro

Lati Qoro

Group Manager HR, Governance & Corporate Affairs, Vinod Patel Group



Tuesday December 1, 2020 15:30 - 17:00 +12
Britannia room 3 Victoria Parade, Suva, Fiji

15:30 +12

Gender* dimensions of business impacts
Women[1] and girls, whether as employees, community members, local leaders, or human rights defenders, face higher risks and are disproportionately affected by adverse business activities and operations. They experience violence and discrimination because of harmful social norms, gender stereotypes, inequalities, and patriarchy; and face additional barriers in seeking access to effective remedies. In many instances business and corporations may reproduce and perpetuate gender inequality and discriminatory social norms.

The risks and impact of business related human rights abuses on women and girls are aggravated when gender intersects with other identities such as sexual orientation, gender expression, ethnicity, indigenous status, language, class, age, disability, and living in rural area.

Women and girls living in the Pacific are particularly at risk due to weak governance structures, lack of gender-sensitive human rights due diligence, corruption, entrenched gender inequalities and endemic gender-based violence. The gender differentiated impact of business-related human rights abuses have not been adequately included in discourse and efforts are being undertaken to ensure Pacific women’s and girl’s experiences and voices are heard.

This session aims to:
  • highlight the challenges and impact of business activities and operations on Pacific women and girls
  • provide a platform for further dialogue on gender, business and human rights
  • raise sensitivity among all stakeholders about the need to adopt a gender perspective in implementing the UNGPs

[1] All reference to women and girls includes transwomen and queer people that identify as women and girls.

* The term “gender” refers to socially constructed roles of and power relations among men, women, and gender non-binary persons, all of whom may be affected differently by business activities.

Session organized by Roshika Deo.

Moderators
avatar for Roshika Deo

Roshika Deo

Feminist, Social Development/Inclusion Specialist

Speakers
avatar for Sidhant Maharaj

Sidhant Maharaj

Community Working Group Lead - Australia and the Pacific, Royal Commonwealth Society
avatar for Cressida Kuala

Cressida Kuala

Founder and CEO, Founder of Porgera Red Wara (River) Women's Association (PNG)
I'm Cressida Kuala from Papua New Guine. I have been advocating for human rights of women rights and environmental degradation for 9 years now against the giant Canadian owned gold mining company Barrick. I am concerned about lives/livelihoods and the environment.People should talk... Read More →
avatar for Tiantaake Mariana

Tiantaake Mariana

President, Kiribati Women in Maritime Association
avatar for Najat Maalla M’jid

Najat Maalla M’jid

Special Representative, UN Secretary-General on Violence against Children
Dr. M'jid, a medical doctor in paediatrics, has over the last three decades devoted her life to the promotion and protection of children’s rights.  She was Head of the Paediatric Department and Director of the Hay Hassani Mother-Child hospital in Casablanca.  Dr. M'jid is a member... Read More →
avatar for Chantelle Khan

Chantelle Khan

Coordinator, Social Empowerment and Education Program (SEEP)



Tuesday December 1, 2020 15:30 - 17:00 +12
Britannia room 1 Victoria Parade, Suva, Fiji

17:15 +12

Special Address: Closing of day one
Moderators
avatar for Robert Vaughan

Robert Vaughan

Human Rights Officer, OHCHR

Speakers
avatar for Saunoamaali’i Karanina Sumeo

Saunoamaali’i Karanina Sumeo

Equal Employment Opportunities Commissioner, New Zealand Human Rights Commission
Saunoamaali’i Karanina Sumeo is the Equal Employment Opportunities Commissioner at the New Zealand Human Rights Commission.She is of Samoan descent and a mother to three children.Saunoamaali'i has worked as a public advisor, consultant, and social worker, advocating for the rights... Read More →


Tuesday December 1, 2020 17:15 - 17:45 +12
Britannia room 1 Victoria Parade, Suva, Fiji
 
Wednesday, December 2
 

09:00 +12

Plastic pollution impacts on human rights in the pacific region
There are documented impacts on human rights at every stage of the plastics life cycle. Such impacts can be disproportionate to the livelihoods of individuals who are dependent on the ecosystem of the Pacific Ocean.

During this session, panelists from diverse backgrounds and sectors will come together for the first time, to present their work and reflect how the implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights can contribute to tackle plastic pollution in the Pacific.

This session aims to:
  • Show intersections between human rights and pollution from plastics in the Pacific region.
  • Discuss how a rights-based approach applied to the whole life cycle of plastics is necessary to prevent and redress the human rights impacts of plastic.
  • Discuss the duties and responsibilities of actors such as Governments and the private sector, and in reference to protection, discuss how to respect and redress communities in the Pacific affected by plastic pollution.
  • Highlight how Indigenous Peoples from the Pacific are using Traditional Knowledge to reduce the need for plastic and mitigate harms from plastic pollution.

Session organized by Center for International Environmental Law, Environmental Investigation Agency,  Massey University, and WWF-Pacific. 

Moderators
avatar for Catherine Murupaenga-Ikenn

Catherine Murupaenga-Ikenn

Senior indigenous fellow, OHCHR

Speakers
LG

Liese Galvin

Policy Officer, Environment Division, New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs & Trade
avatar for Tina Ngata

Tina Ngata

Researcher, scientist, advocate, Ngāti Porou Indigenous peoples advocate; plastics researcher, scientist, and environmental planner
Indigenous rights. Environmental rights. Plastic Pollution. Marine Litter. Waste Colonialism.
avatar for Surya Deva

Surya Deva

Member, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights
avatar for Andrew Irvin

Andrew Irvin

Waste Management & Resource Recovery Association of Fiji (WMRRAF)
avatar for Sacha Fuller

Sacha Fuller

Research and Innovation Division, University of Newcastle



Wednesday December 2, 2020 09:00 - 10:30 +12
Britannia room 3 Victoria Parade, Suva, Fiji

09:00 +12

Responsible Extractives in the Pacific: realities and challenges
While the extractives sector is an important contributor to the economies of several Pacific countries, it has also been associated with severe adverse impacts including human rights violations, pollution, social disruption and exacerbated inequalities. What are extractive companies and producing countries doing to prevent and mitigate these kinds of risks? What are some of the major issues currently playing out in the region?

The session will explore key themes related to the extraction of minerals, metals, oil and gas in the Pacific region. Topics covered will include, for example, indigenous peoples’ rights, gender equality, governance and accountability, grievance and remedy, tailings disposal, and seabed mining and deep sea mining. The session will include a diversity of perspectives and encourage an open discussion of the realities facing Pacific countries, local communities, companies, and other stakeholders.

This session aims to:
  • Highlight some of the key issues related to extractives activities in the Pacific – including both current and proposed operations;
  • Encourage open and constructive dialogue on the challenges involved in ensuring responsible practices in the extractives sector in the region; and
  • Set out specific recommendations for key actors (including industry and governments) to take action to improve the uptake of responsible practices.

Session organized by Responsible Mining Foundation. 

Moderators
avatar for Valmaine Toki

Valmaine Toki

Associate Professor of Law, University of Waikato
Indigenous. Ngapuhi Ngatiwai. Former Expert Member UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, Indigenous appointed Pacific Representative. Write, research and teach within the area of recognising Indigenous rights within legal systems.

Speakers
avatar for Alanna Smith

Alanna Smith

Conservation Programme Manager, Te Ipukarea Society, Cook Islands
Alanna has worked for environmental NGO Te Ipukarea Society in the Cook Islands since 2015. She has a Bachelor of Applied Science in Environmental Management from Otago University New Zealand, and a Masters in Conservation Biology from Victoria University, New Zealand. Through TIS... Read More →
avatar for Catherine Coumans

Catherine Coumans

Research Coordinator and Asia-Pacific Program Coordinator, Mining Watch Canada
My work at MiningWatch Canada is carried out in solidarity with communities and indigenous peoples and focuses on human rights and environmental impacts of Canadian mining companies operating primarily in Asia-Pacific. Additionally, I work on a broad range on corporate accountability... Read More →
avatar for Pierre De Pasquale

Pierre De Pasquale

Head of Stakeholder Engagement, Responsible Mining Foundation, Switzerland
Pierre De Pasquale is the Head of Stakeholder Engagement at the Responsible Mining Foundation (RMF), which he joined in 2016. RMF is an independent research organisation that encourages continuous improvement in responsible mining across the industry by developing tools and frameworks... Read More →
TN

Tevita Naikasowalu

Human, Ecological and Indigenous Rights defender, Fiji
avatar for Cressida Kuala

Cressida Kuala

Founder and CEO, Founder of Porgera Red Wara (River) Women's Association (PNG)
I'm Cressida Kuala from Papua New Guine. I have been advocating for human rights of women rights and environmental degradation for 9 years now against the giant Canadian owned gold mining company Barrick. I am concerned about lives/livelihoods and the environment.People should talk... Read More →
avatar for Jonathan Mesulam

Jonathan Mesulam

Spokesperson, Alliance of Solwara Warriors, Papua New Guinea
avatar for Emmanuel Peni

Emmanuel Peni

Human Rights Defender and Co-ordinator, Project Sepik (PNG)
Author of a book called ‘Sibona’, Manu mostly worked in the Not for Profit Sector. He graduated in the area of Applied Science but mostly worked as a Social Worker and in Management. Manu set up a Community Based Micro Financing Organisation in West Sepik Province, Papua New Guinea... Read More →
avatar for Gavin Mudd

Gavin Mudd

Associate Professor, RMIT University, Australia
Gavin Mudd has been an active researcher on the environmental impacts and sustainability of mining for over two decades, providing an independent scholarly voice which is recognised around the world. His work has included building big data sets to assess declining ore grades, increasing... Read More →
avatar for Val Madsen

Val Madsen

Executive General Manager People, St Barbara Limited
Val joined St Barbara in September 2013 and was appointed Executive General Manager People in 2020. A member of the Executive Leadership Team, Val leads the Human Resources and Health, Safety, Environment and Community functions.With a Masters in Education and a number of other business... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2020 09:00 - 10:30 +12
Britannia room 1 Victoria Parade, Suva, Fiji

11:00 +12

Building Back Better – the UNGPs, the Right to Development and the 2030 Agenda
This session will explore the critical role of business in realising the 2030 Agenda, the importance of the UNGPs as a framework that can guide and provide a level playing field for businesses – and the challenges of promoting and applying the UNGPs in the specific context of the Pacific.

Experiences in localising the SDGs will be shared and the panel and session participants will discuss how the UNGPs can also be best localised to the Pacific in the context of COVID-recovery and the imperative to build-back better.

This session aims to:
  • Explore the linkages between the UNGPs and SDGs;
  • Build awareness of the right to development, UNGPs and SDGs;
  • Enable multi-stakeholder dialogue; and
  • Identify some recommendations for localising the UNGPs to the Pacific.

Session organized by The Diplomacy Training Program.

Moderators
avatar for Patrick Earle

Patrick Earle

Executive Director, Diplomacy Training Program (DTP)
Since 2003, Patrick has been the Executive Director of DTP (www.dtp.unsw.edu.au) - an NGO affiliated with the Faculty of Law at UNSW, Sydney. Patrick has over two decades experience of working with others to defend and advance human rights.  Working with Amnesty International, Patrick... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Joshua Cooper

Joshua Cooper

Executive Director, University of Hawaii
Cooper is the Dean of the Global Leadership Academy for Human Rights Advocacy in Geneva, Switzerland and Lecturer at the University of Hawai'i. Cooper is interested in issue of human rights, sustainable development goals, indigenous peoples and climate justice. Cooper is involved... Read More →
avatar for Dante Pesce

Dante Pesce

Vice Chairperson, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights
Mr. Dante Pesce holds a Masters in Political Science from the Catholic University of Chile and a Masters in Public Administration from Harvard University. He is the Founder and Executive Director of the VINCULAR Center for Social Responsibility and Sustainable Development at the Catholic... Read More →
avatar for Rosie Catherine

Rosie Catherine

Programme Officer, Pacific Disability
Ms. Rosie Catherine is responsible for disability inclusive churches and theological schools and intellectual disabilities. Generally her role is assisting with the successful coordination, implementation, monitoring, evaluation and reporting of PDF's programme activities and objectives... Read More →
avatar for Evelyn Daimoi-Ofasia

Evelyn Daimoi-Ofasia

Program Manager, Law and Justice Program, Australian High Commission, Papua New Guinea (gov.)
Evelyn Daimoi-Ofasia is a Development Practitioner from Papua New Guinea with experience implementing gender and social inclusion programs addressing human rights issues relating to family and sexual violence, sorcery accusation related violence and juvenile justice.
avatar for Eveleen Hayden

Eveleen Hayden

CEO, Cook Islands Chamber of Commerce
I own and manage a couple of tourism accommodation places in Rarotonga, and have been on the Board of the Chamber for the past couple of years. The Chamber recently underwent a transformation to more closely deliver what our business community needs here and I am the acting CEO helping... Read More →
avatar for Georgina Naigulevu

Georgina Naigulevu

Vice-Chair and Board Treasurer, Pacific Islands Chapter of the Internet Society
ADVOCATE | CO-FOUNDER| INTERNET STRATEGIST | CHAIRWOMAN | MANAGING DIRECTOR | SENIOR MANAGER APPLICATIONS, PROJECTS AND INNOVATION | MENTORGeorgina, born with limited mobility, is a Christian Advocate for mainstreaming Persons with Disability through strategic partnerships toward... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2020 11:00 - 12:30 +12
Britannia room 3 Victoria Parade, Suva, Fiji

11:00 +12

Implementing UN Guiding Principles: Pathways for the Pacific
The UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGPs) are the authoritative global standard to promote business respect for human rights. Several states in Asia have been taking steps to implement the UNGPs by developing a national action plan on business and human rights (NAP) or by taking other legal-policy measures. Various business enterprises are also responding to growing expectations of stakeholders to respect human rights by conducting human rights due diligence. However, the progress in the Pacific region has been slow so far. This session will examine different pathways for states in the Pacific to implement the UNGPs and make linkages with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). It will also discuss why state and businesses should take seriously the business and human rights agenda.

This session aims to:
  • Explore different pathways for the Pacific states to implement the UNGPs;
  • Learn from the experience of other states in Asia to implement the UNGPs by developing a stand-alone NAP or by taking other measures; and
  • Discuss how the NAPs in the Pacific region could also assist states in implementing the SDGs and overcoming other local challenges such as environmental pollution, climate change and gender-based violence.

Session organized by UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights. 

Moderators
avatar for Surya Deva

Surya Deva

Member, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights

Speakers
avatar for Natasha Khan

Natasha Khan

Coordinator, Diploma in Leadership, Governance and Human Rights, University of South Pacific School of Governance
avatar for Vanessa Zimmerman

Vanessa Zimmerman

CEO / Board member, Pillar Two / Global Compact Network Australia
Vanessa is a recognised global and domestic corporate sustainability expert focusing on human rights.Originally an anti-trust lawyer, Vanessa specialised in business and human rights, working for five years as a Legal Advisor to the UN Special Representative on Business and Human... Read More →
avatar for Livio Sarandrea

Livio Sarandrea

Chief Adviser and Manager, Business and Human Rights in Asia, UNDP
Livio Sarandrea, is the Chief Adviser and Manager of UNDP’s project: “Business and Human Rights in Asia promoting Responsible Business practices through regional partnerships (B+HR Asia)”. A Human Rights lawyer with 20 years of field experience in Southeast Europe, Africa and... Read More →
avatar for Christina Sakato

Christina Sakato

Policy Officer, Conservation Environment Protection Authority (CEPA), Papua New Guinea
My name is Christina Sakato, a policy officer with Conservation and Environment Protection Authority of Papua New Guinea. My work mainly revolves around policy review and analysis, providing technical information on ratification of environmental agreements (Nagoya Protocol on Access... Read More →
avatar for Ashwin Raj

Ashwin Raj

Director, Fiji Human Rights and Anti-Discrimination Commission


Wednesday December 2, 2020 11:00 - 12:30 +12
Britannia room 1 Victoria Parade, Suva, Fiji

13:30 +12

Access to Remedy and Corporate Accountability
Access to remedy remains a key challenge for communities and worker groups whose human rights are breached by business. This challenge is greater when the business is domiciled outside of the country where the breach occurred. Communities and workers lack information about avenues for accessing remedy, and lack of capacity to make claims. Power asymmetries between Pacific Island communities and worker groups, and transnational business, are especially large, making claims even harder.

What forums are available for resolving human rights grievances, and how successful are they in addressing the types of harms that communities and workers suffer? This session will explore a range of fora and discuss cases which have been brought by Pacific Island claimants against transnational business.

This session aims to:
  • Assess different avenues for resolving grievances and providing remedy to communities and workers whose human rights are breached by business.
  • Explore the factors that community and worker groups should consider before bringing a claim.
  • Discuss the assistance that communities and workers can access in making these claims.
  • Explore how business can address grievances in good faith.

Session organized by Associate Professor Shelley Marshall, RMIT University. 

Moderators
avatar for Shelley Marshall

Shelley Marshall

Associate Professor, RMIT University

Speakers
avatar for Padma Raman

Padma Raman

Chief Executive, Australian Human Rights Commission
avatar for Ashwin Raj

Ashwin Raj

Director, Fiji Human Rights and Anti-Discrimination Commission
avatar for Joe Moses

Joe Moses

Claimant, Paga Hill
Human Rights Defender, contributing to make this world a better place to live.
avatar for John Southalan

John Southalan

Independent Examiner, AusNCP



Wednesday December 2, 2020 13:30 - 15:00 +12
Britannia room 3 Victoria Parade, Suva, Fiji

13:30 +12

Contemporary forms of slavery and labour rights
During this session, a panel representing the region and the various stakeholders involved in the combat against modern slavery will be discussing the legal framework and obligations for private sector in the Pacific. We will be guided by some best practices and highlight the challenges faced by state actors and businesses in further working towards eradication of contemporary forms of slavery. Furthermore, we will be elaborating on CSOs’ role in supporting the governments and businesses in meeting their obligations. This dialogue will be enriched with examples from different supply chains in the Pacific.
Session’s objectives

The objective of this session is to:
  • Provide a forum to facilitate knowledge sharing on modern slavery in various supply chains in the Pacific, among key stakeholders in the region; 
  • Share issues and concerns that may be collectively addressed; and 
  • Exchange good practices through case studies. 

Session organized by International Organization for Migration (IOM). 

Moderators
avatar for KIVINIEMI-SIDDIQ Peppi

KIVINIEMI-SIDDIQ Peppi

Senior Regional Migrant Protection Specialist, IOM
Countering human trafficking in all its forms and providing assistance to vulnerable migrants, whether in a regular or irregular situation.

Speakers
PK

Patricia Kailola

Chief Executive Officer, Pacifika Network (formerly Pacific Dialogue Ltd).
RT

Rigamoto Taito

General Manager / Deputy Chairperson, WORMALD in Fiji / Modern Slavery Committee by the Fiji Commerce and Employers Federation (FCEF)
avatar for Elena Gerasimova

Elena Gerasimova

Decent Work and International Labour Standards Specialist, ILO Office for Pacific Island Countries
avatar for Lisa Singh

Lisa Singh

Head Govt Advocacy, Walk Free
The Hon Lisa Singh is Head of Government Advocacy Australia-Pacific at Walk Free, an international human rights organization working to end modern slavery globally within our generation. She is a former Australian Senator who was instrumental in the policy development of Australia's... Read More →
avatar for Atish Kumar

Atish Kumar

Acting Deputy Secretary, Ministry of Employment, Productivity and Industrial Relations, Fiji



Wednesday December 2, 2020 13:30 - 15:00 +12
Britannia room 1 Victoria Parade, Suva, Fiji

15:30 +12

Civil Society and Human Rights Defenders in the Pacific
Like so many other regions of the world. the Pacific Island region plays host to sectors where the abuse of human rights by business actors is prevalent if not common. Access to land and ocean resources is a major cause of conflict, as corporations look to secure rights to harvest the wealth of the region’s land and oceans. In many cases the companies involved are multinational enterprises that are not based in the Pacific, but who nevertheless have operations there.

This panel will explore these questions with respect to three sectors in particular: forestry, the mining/extractives and fishing. What are the types of pressures that activists in the Pacific face when it comes these sectors? How are human rights defenders in PIC civil society responding to these threats? How can the protection of human rights defenders relate to the UN Guiding Principles on Human Rights (UNGPs)? And what can be done to give greater protection to them?

This session aims to:
  • Provide a spotlight on the challenges facing human rights defenders in the Pacific, including the dangers they face;
  • Identify the main causes that are putting human rights defenders at risk; and
  • Begin to discuss how the business and human rights community might begin to create a safer environment for human rights defenders in the Pacific.

Session organized by Dr Luke Fletcher, Jubilee Australia Research Centre.

Moderators
avatar for Dr Luke Fletcher

Dr Luke Fletcher

Executive Director, Jubilee Australia Research Centre
Jubilee Australia is a research and advocacy organisation that looks at the impact that Australian businesses and government policies have on our neighbours in the region.

Speakers
avatar for Emmanuel Peni

Emmanuel Peni

Human Rights Defender and Co-ordinator, Project Sepik (PNG)
Author of a book called ‘Sibona’, Manu mostly worked in the Not for Profit Sector. He graduated in the area of Applied Science but mostly worked as a Social Worker and in Management. Manu set up a Community Based Micro Financing Organisation in West Sepik Province, Papua New Guinea... Read More →
ZW

Zephaniah Winduo

Environmental & Human Rights Defender, Project Sepik (PNG)
avatar for Andy Shen

Andy Shen

Senior Oceans Adviser, Greenpeace USA
Andy Shen is an international human rights lawyer working as Greenpeace USA's Senior Oceans Adviser and the US project lead for Greenpeace's global fisheries campaign (Pan-Asian Fisheries/Beyond Seafood). He previously worked for the International Labour Organization and the International... Read More →
avatar for Natasha Khan

Natasha Khan

Coordinator, Diploma in Leadership, Governance and Human Rights, University of South Pacific School of Governance
avatar for Alisi Rabukawaqa

Alisi Rabukawaqa

Bua Urban Youth Network/IUCN (Fiji)
TN

Tevita Naikasowalu

Human, Ecological and Indigenous Rights defender, Fiji



Wednesday December 2, 2020 15:30 - 17:00 +12
Britannia room 1 Victoria Parade, Suva, Fiji

15:30 +12

Entrepreneurship in sustainable development and future generations
The importance of responsible business practices has been heightened by the devastating consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic. While some businesses have acted responsibly, ensuring that their workers’ salaries are paid and labour rights respected, others have resorted to cost-cutting, de-prioritizing respect for human rights standards in trying to protect their bottom line. Even more disconcertingly, the COVID-19 crisis may yet prove to be a dress rehearsal for the risks and negative impacts that may be wrought by climate-induced disasters that are on the horizon.

The growing reach and impact of business enterprises have given rise to a debate about the roles and responsibilities of such actors with regard to human rights and have led to the placement of business and human rights on the UN agenda. This session will focus on entrepreneurship for sustainable development, which is a multilevel phenomenon connecting social, environmental, and economic dimensions between entrepreneurial processes, market transformations, as well as large-scale societal developments. Modern concept of entrepreneurship is all about exercising creativity in business activities, product development, process development, problem solutions, and change management at large (Robinson, 2004). The concept of social entrepreneurship is where an entrepreneur will exercise innovation for a noble cause mostly for socio-economic development and environmental protection. The most simplified form of the concept is “entrepreneurship and innovation for sustainability - business with a cause” (Abrahamsson, 2006). This warrants voluntary actions for pro-active change in business practices through innovative solutions of problem or exploring opportunities on poverty, health and sanitation, recycling, world peace and justice, human security issues etc. The concept merges entrepreneurship with social and ecological development. Sustainability concept refers to entrepreneurial or intrepreneurial approaches that aids an integrated development of social, environmental, and economic issues that help an organisation to continue its business for the long run (Schaltegger & Burritt, 2005; Whiteman, Walker, & Perego, 2013).

This session aims to:
  • Discuss the potential of social entrepreneurship as a possible solution to sustainable development challenges.
  • Encapsulate how policymakers can directly support entrepreneurship for sustainable development and future generations.
  • Show how entrepreneurs may pursue economic viability and at the same time contribute to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals by reducing inequality, enhancing social cohesion and tackling environmental challenges.
  • Strengthen access to justice and access to adequate remedies for victims of business-related human rights abuses.
  • Provide advice to entrepreneurs on how to assess and address human rights risks in their supply chains.

Additional Background document link: The Rights of Future Generations, A New Legal Humanism

Session organized by Raeed Roshan Ali, Precious Plastic Fiji.

Moderators
avatar for Miki Wali

Miki Wali

Co-Founder, Haus of Khameleon

Speakers
avatar for Sagufta Salma Janif

Sagufta Salma Janif

Coordinator for Fusion Hub Social Enterprise Fiji, Fiji Youth Entrepreneurship Council
Founder/Director at The Fusion Hub (Social Enterprise) & BulaLance. Won the 2020 regional commonwealth youth award and is one of the recipients of the MaiLife 30 Under 30 award. Is also a member of the Alliance for Future Generations Fiji. She is an experienced marketing professional... Read More →
avatar for Matin Karimli

Matin Karimli

Director, ILO Office for the Pacific Island Countries
Mr Karimli debuted his career with the ILO in February 2020 with the posting in the ILO Office for PICs.He is responsible for supporting eleven ILO member States (Fiji, Kiribati, Republic of Marshall Islands, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu and Vanuatu, Tonga... Read More →
avatar for Brian Kironde

Brian Kironde

Technical Specialist, adolescents and youth, UNFPA – Pacific Sub Region Office - Fiji
Brian has previously served with UNFPA as the International Program Coordinator for RMNCAH in Kiribati, Int’l Programme Specialist for ASRH and team leader for Youth & Gender in Liberia and prior to that, served with UNFPA Uganda and New York headquarters supporting policy & programming... Read More →
MB

Mue Bentley Fisher

Co-founder and Director, Weta Coffee
Mother, entrepreneur, coffee lover, optimist, Owner of WetaFiji. Mue Bentley Fisher is the co-founder and director of Weta Coffee, which is raising money for Australia's firefighting efforts. On her TEDx talk, she shared her tips on starting a business from scratch, brand positioning... Read More →
avatar for Mererai Vatege

Mererai Vatege

Chairperson-FTUC Youth Committee, Fiji Trades Union Congress (FTUC)
Mere is currently the Senior Industrial Relations Officer for the National Union of Workers (NUW), a Trade Union based in Lautoka. NUW is an affiliate of the Fiji Trades Union Congress the umbrella body for all unions in Fiji which is affiliated to the ITUC and the ITUC-AP. Mere is... Read More →



Wednesday December 2, 2020 15:30 - 17:00 +12
Britannia room 3 Victoria Parade, Suva, Fiji

17:15 +12

Closing Plenary: Way Forward in Implementing UN Guiding Principles in the Pacific
The focus of this session will be on setting a “futuristic agenda” for the Pacific region in promoting responsible business conduct in line with the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights.

What should governments and businesses do in coming years to deal with challenges such as climate change, gender-based violence, exploitation of workers’ rights, environmental pollution, etc.? How can public-private partnerships be strengthened to achieve the SDGs? How can we build back better more inclusive and sustainable societies in the region?

Keynote address by H.E. David Kabua, President of the Republic of the Marshall Islands.

Moderators
avatar for Surya Deva

Surya Deva

Member, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights

Speakers
avatar for Golda Benjamin

Golda Benjamin

Programme Director, Business & Human Rights Resource Centre
Golda S. Benjamin is the Programme Director of Business & Human Rights Resource Centre and is responsible for the organisation's portfolios on Asia, Corporate Legal Accountability, and Labour. She has worked extensively on land and labour rights, transparency in the extractives sector... Read More →
avatar for Kylie Porter

Kylie Porter

Executive Director, Global Compact Network Australia (GCNA)
I am the Executive Director of the Global Compact Network Australia (GCNA); the Australian chapter of the world's largest business-led sustainability initiative, The United Nations Global Compact. I am a responsible business expert with over 15 years of experience in corporate affairs... Read More →
avatar for Simona Marinescu

Simona Marinescu

UN Resident Coordinator, Resident Coordinator Office (RCO)
As the UN Resident Coordinator heading a UN Multi-Country Office that serves the Cook Islands, Niue Samoa, and Tokelau, Ms. Simona Marinescu leads a UN Country Team of 12 UN agencies based in Samoa.Ms. Marinescu has over 20 years of experience in international development coordination... Read More →
avatar for Ernest Gibson

Ernest Gibson

Pacific representative, UN Secretary General's Youth Advisory Group on Climate Change
Ernest Gibson is serving as a UN75 Outreach Officer with the Resident Coordinator's Office in Fiji, providing support for the UN75 global campaign.Ernest is active in the Pacific civil society and international cooperation networks, having worked for the Delegation of the European Union for the Pacific and Oxfam. He is also a member of the Technical Advisory Group for the Pacific Youth Council and the Pacif... Read More →
avatar for H.E. David Kabua

H.E. David Kabua

President, Government of the Republic of the Marshall Islands
His Excellency David KabuaPresident David Kabua is the ninth President of the Republic of the Marshall Islands. President Kabua has been representing Wotho Atoll since his first appointment in 2008. In his second term, he was given the portfolio as the Minister of Health and then... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2020 17:15 - 18:00 +12
Britannia room 1 Victoria Parade, Suva, Fiji
 
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